On-Demand Webinar

Microsoft Teams 102: A deeper dive into maximizing remote work collaboration and productivity.

Be sure to watch this informative follow up to our Microsoft Teams 101 introductory webinar as we dive deeper into using Microsoft Teams to maximize remote worker productivity, security, and collaboration.

Webinar Transcript

Tyler Sanders:

Good afternoon and thank you for joining our webinar. This is the second part to our Microsoft Teams and 365 webinar series. In case you missed part one last month, we’ll send out a link to that recording along with some other resources as a follow-up from today’s session. To start off, we’ll just go over some housekeeping around the webinar today. We have all attendees in listen only mode, so microphones are muted. We’re currently broadcasting in Microsoft Teams Live events, so this is new for us. We figured it appropriate to try doing a live event using teams rather than go to webinars, since the topic is Teams. Webinar’s being recorded and we’ll send out access to that after the session and it will go out to all registered attendees.

Tyler Sanders:

During the webinar, you can ask questions using the Q&A on the top right side of the screen. We’ll also leave 15 minutes at the end of the webinar for any additional questions as follow-ups. Please let us know via the chat if you’re experiencing any audio issues or have problems along the way with the webinar. We’ve got a jam packed agenda for you today that will dive deeper into the Microsoft Teams and 365 platform. Most of the content today is new and a progression from our previous webinar. But we’ll do some recaps to re-familiarize everyone with some of the basics. For anyone that missed the first part, we’ll go over those basics again.

Tyler Sanders:

We’re going to start off just with a quick introduction to Vertex in case you’re not familiar with us and also with the presenting team. We’ll do a recap of the Teams platform related to what it actually is and why you would use it. We’ll go into the security surrounding Microsoft Teams and 365. Then we’ll dive right into the first part of our demonstration, where we’ll show you how to build Teams, channels, set permissions around them, use the chat platform within a channel, and other functions surrounding Teams and channels. Neil will then take us through an overview to better understand OneDrive, SharePoint and how they relate to the file sharing and storage aspect of Teams.

Tyler Sanders:

Second part of our demo will focus on adding different applications to channels, along with file collaboration and file sharing. We’ll then look at the video conferencing feature within Teams and do a comparison between that and Zoom. Final part of the demonstration today will focus on how to set up a meeting, how to set up video conferencing and the options within that. Finally, as a wrap up we’ll give you some links to additional resources as follow-up items that you can do after the webinar and time for a Q&A. We’ll also send out those links by a follow-up email so that you have those links in an email.

Tyler Sanders:

Quickly, for those of you not familiar with Vertex, we’re an IT managed service provider that specializes in the legal industry. Our core focus is on cybersecurity solutions, help desk and managed IT services, backup and disaster recovery, private and public cloud solutions and technology consulting. The presenting team today is myself Tyler Sanders, the CEO and founder of Vertex and I’ll be the moderator for our webinar. My background, I’ve been in IT for 25 years and spent the last 12 years in the role of CEO at Vertex which I founded in 2008. Next we have Neil Murray, who is one of our virtual Chief Information Officers. Neil’s role at Vertex is working closely with our clients to help them reduce risk and better leverage technology to improve their business efficiencies.

Tyler Sanders:

Neil also has 25 years of experience in the IT industry, spending the latter part of his career heavily focused on IT security and risk mitigation. Neil will be providing you with information on several key areas with Teams, 365 platform along with the security related components to it. Last but not least, we have Hamed Sultani. He’s a Technology Alignment Manager at Vertex. He works closely with our clients to improve their security, uptime performance and overall stability of their IT environments. Hamed also has an extensive background in IT security and extremely knowledgeable in all things IT. He’ll be doing the demonstration portion within Teams and showing you the key functions there.

Tyler Sanders:

Without further ado, I’ll hand this over to Neil so that he can give you an overview of the Teams platform, what it is exactly and the application of you using it in your firm.

Neil Murray:

Okay, great. Thank you, Tyler. For these next couple of slides, actually, for anyone that was in the first session, these will be familiar to you. But I did want to start with giving another background again of what exactly Microsoft Teams is. If we look at Microsoft themselves, the way they put it … There we go. They say Microsoft Teams is a unified communication collaboration platform that combines persistent workplace chat, video meetings, file storage, and outpatient integration. Great. What does that mean? Really what Microsoft has done, they have all these applications and platforms that they’ve been moving more and more out to the cloud, and Teams ties it all into one central location where you can get at everything.

Neil Murray:

I’m going to go through some examples of how Teams ties into some of these applications. One of the big things that they do now is they add chat. I put the word persistent chat here and I’ll touch on that in a minute. Chat is not something that Microsoft did previously. But if you’re familiar with platforms such as Slack, this is the same type of thing that’s there. It gives you the ability to communicate instantly, just in a chat window with some of your colleagues. You can do it one-on-one. You can have groups or what they call teams now that you can have ongoing communication and chats, anytime you want to do it. The word persistent comes in because this chat doesn’t go away.

Neil Murray:

It stays there if you need to search on keywords, or there’s certain topics you want to find, that’s always there and available to you. The second thing, what Team’s ties into is OneDrive and SharePoint. These are terms you might have heard in the past. These are some of Microsoft’s file storage and collaboration platforms. I’ll be touching on these in a bit more detail later on the presentation. But I did want to highlight the fact that Teams does tie into these applications, so these platforms that they have. Microsoft, they also integrate with a lot of other applications. Some are their own. For example, Microsoft OneNote is a tool we’ve been using at Vertex for years.

Neil Murray:

It now ties right into Teams, where we can get access to all our OneNote platforms. Things like Microsoft Planner, that second icon I have there, this can tie in. They also tie into literally hundreds of other applications. I did one [inaudible 00:08:20] potentially recognizable icon here with Survey Monkey. You can also pull in stock apps, to measure your stocks, look at weather apps, all that kind of thing can all be tied into Microsoft Teams. One of the big things is the ability to do voice and video meetings. This, what we’re doing now is an extension of those video meetings.

Neil Murray:

But this is how we conduct pretty much all of our client facing meetings now, it’s we like to use Teams, both for our internal communication and for virtual meetings with our clients, especially during COVID when we can’t come in person. What I did want to highlight here is that, it ties in very closely with your calendar that is based on Microsoft Exchange platform or the Exchange Online, which is often known as Microsoft 365 now. I wanted to highlight this because it’s important to know that anything you have booked in Teams in that calendar is the same calendar that is on Office 365, which is the same calendar that you’re going to see in Microsoft Outlook on your phone, on your tablets. Everything is in one place.

Neil Murray:

You’re not dealing with multiple calendars. Having everything in one place is very handy. Then the question may come up, why would you want to use Teams in your office? One of the big things that we’re seeing now, especially during COVID, is the fact that anyone anywhere as long as you have internet connections can get into Teams. Whether you’re working from home, from the office, from a café, from the airport, as long as you have internet access, you can get into Teams without having to worry about opening up a VPN or logging into some special applications to tie you back to the office. This is always available to you.

Neil Murray:

As I mentioned previously, it ties everything in together. If you’re using multiple Microsoft platforms already, such as OneNote and SharePoint, things like that, everything gets tied in together and you can have it all accessible in one place in one platform. Security is a big piece of Microsoft’s focus. They’ve been focusing on security for years. I’m going to get into in a later slide a bit more information about how they’ve made Teams and Office 365 secure, but it does tie into Active Directory [inaudible 00:10:36] here. Perhaps one of the things that’s helped us the most lately, is the ability to bring in people from outside your organization into your meetings.

Neil Murray:

It’s not just for internal. You can turn this on so that you can invite external contacts into your meetings. I did want to touch on the fact though that by default is web based only. If you want to add a dial-in option you can do that but its $5.10 per user. That’s not per user dialing in, but per user that’s hosting it. So Tyler, for example, has a $5 hosting fee to have that. I have a $5 hosting fee. It doesn’t matter how many people dial-in, the fact I’m hosting it, I’m covered. Okay. Microsoft Security, as I mentioned that’s the thing I wanted to touch on. As I said Microsoft has been focusing on their security for years now, especially on their 365 platform.

Neil Murray:

There’s a lot of options they’ve added that you can purchase and add to your presence in Office 365. One of them is the Advanced Threat Protection. What this adds whether it’s an email or Teams or OneDrive for sharing files, it does two main things. Number one is it scans your files, anything you post or receive an email, it scans it very in-depth more than just the usual cursory view that Exchange would do, looking for viruses or malware, that sort of thing. URL scanning is something I find very useful in the battle against phishing attempts. You’ve seen those emails that come in and they try and trick you into clicking somewhere to log in your information.

Neil Murray:

They can steal your username, password. What this does is it replaces the URL in an email to a link that goes to a Microsoft server first, so when you click on it, it goes to Microsoft, they then go out and check the site for you. If it’s safe, it lets you through. If it sees sign of any kind of malware or that if you get a downloaded file that could be malicious, it’s actually going to block that and put a warning up instead and say, “Hey, we found malicious information here.” It’s really nice tool against phishing. Data Loss Prevention, protection is another tool they have as an option for you. What this does is it monitors for sensitive information such as credit cards.

Neil Murray:

If you deal with payment type situations, it’s going to prevent you from accidentally sending out a credit card in an email. You can have it look for healthcare information. They can look for SIM numbers, really anything that comes down to personally identifiable information that can be covered by [inaudible 00:13:10]. It’s going to prevent you from accidentally sending these out. Two Factor Authentication. This is huge. These days, I don’t trust anything online, just a username and password. Two Factor Authentication is the ability to have another way to prove you are who you said you are. The icon I added here is Microsoft’s own authenticator app.

Neil Murray:

If you have this, when you try logging in, you have to also provide six digits from this app. This can also be tied into third party applications such as Duo. It can send you a text and you can even configure it to call you on a landline to prove you are who you say you are when you try logging in. Microsoft employs a lot of encryption and everything they do in their cloud environment. Everything that you store in their cloud is covered by what’s called encryption at rest through a platform called BitLocker. Anything that’s communicated or data in transit, so if it’s going through email or it’s transferring from one server to another or down to your system is being protected also by TLS encryption protocols.

Neil Murray:

The other thing it comes down to compliance. Microsoft has worked really hard to making sure they’re compliant to many, many different organizations. Some of your businesses may have to adhere to ISO standards or be SOC compliant, that sort of thing. I’ve picked three recognizable icons here to illustrate but really, there’s dozens of different compliance protocols that they adhere to everything in their back ends. What’s important to mention about all these applications I’m putting here other than maybe the encryption, a lot of this are add-ons. When you first go into Office 365, they’re protected in the back end, but your instance it’s wide open to how you want to design it.

Neil Murray:

These are add-ons, you can add and we need to go in and hard and then make sure you’re taking advantage of all their security features that they have available to you. The last thing I wanted to mention is on within Microsoft Teams, there is security restrictions, if you’re used to when you have file shares, you can restrict those to individual users, individual groups and/or to the whole company, you can do this within teams as well and Hamed will be demonstrating that later. That covers some of what I wanted to say at first. I’m going to hand this back over to Tyler to start talking about some of our demonstrations.

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, great. Thanks, Neil. Very important stuff. As Neil mentioned, there’s a lot that you can do around the security in the 365 and Team’s platform. But by default, it’s pretty wide open and not as secure as it should be if you’re going to use it within your organization. Important to reach out to us and it’s stuff that we’re working constantly with our clients on, to harden their environments and make sure that the layers of security are in place. Now that we’ve gone over some of the basics in the security, I wanted to dive right into the product. Hamed’s going to start by showing us some of the differences in between what a Team is in the team’s platform and what a channel is, how to set permissions on that.

Tyler Sanders:

Whether you want it as a Public Channel within your firm, or whether you want to have it as a Private Channel, just for a few members within the firm, how to use the chat platform within a Channel, how to use the chat platform within just the overall Teams platform in your organization. How to do recordings of chats and recordings of Team meetings, the ability to take notes while you’re having a video conferencing meeting, and record those notes and store those notes, and everything else that’s really within those chat, sorry within those Channel and Team modules.

Tyler Sanders:

We’ll hand it over now to Hamed to do a screen share of the Teams platform and take you through these steps.

Hamed Sultani:

Thank you, Tyler. I’ll begin by sharing my screen here. Okay. All right. Neil and Tyler mentioned, Microsoft Team is a collaboration tool that provides your staff with the ability to work together and share information from a common space. In the first demo, I’ll introduce some useful tools that you can use to leverage and get the most out of Microsoft Teams. I’ll begin by discussing what Microsoft Teams and Channels are. We’re familiar with the core concepts of Microsoft Teams. I’m currently logged into Microsoft Teams on the web, and I will click on the left hand side Teams.

Hamed Sultani:

We’re already there. Teams can be thought of as a grouping of people. We recommend you have a Teams created for each of your department to begin with. On the screen, we have lawyers, human resources, accounting, and you can customize it for your organization as you see fit. Channels on the other hand are where the actual work is done, where you’ll hold your meetings, have conversations and collaborate on files. Channels can be dedicated to specific topics, projects, tasks, or just a common area to get everyone’s lunch orders. If we expand the Teams grouping for lawyers, so I’ll do that now.

Hamed Sultani:

We can see all the channels that have been created. Some are private, denoted by the padlock here. While others don’t have the padlock and they’re public channels that anybody added to the lawyers, Teams grouping can access. Another important concept is private versus public. Both Teams groupings and channels can be secured to allow access to only the people in your organization that should have access. I’ll demonstrate how you can create a private Teams grouping and also a private channel. I’ll begin the demonstration now. Down here you see join or create a Team.

Hamed Sultani:

We’ll click on that. We’ll click create Team. We’ll build a Team from scratch, so we’ll click that and here’s the option. In the last webinar, I demonstrated how you can create a public. This somehow creates a private. We’ll name it partners. You could give it a description if you’d like and we’ll click create. Okay, give it some time to finish. Here we have the option of adding people into whoever that needs access to this, we can start adding them. I will add Neil and I’ll also add Tyler to this and I’ll click add, and I’ll click close.

Hamed Sultani:

Now, if I scroll to the bottom, I can see the partners private teams grouping has been created and restricted to only Tyler and Neil, so nobody else in the organization can have access to that. Next, we’ll create a private channel. I’ll show you how to do that now. We’ll click on more options here. We’ll click add channel. Here, we’ll add yearly budget. You can give it a description if you’d like. Under privacy, there’s two options. You have standard which is accessible to everyone on the team, or what we really want is private, accessible only to specific group of people within the team.

Hamed Sultani:

We’ll click next here. Now, we can add again whoever we like. I can add Tyler and Neil to this and click add and we’ll click close. Once you create a private channel, or a private team, a grouping, you can always add or remove people. I’ll show you how you can add or remove people. We’ll click again on the more option here, manage team and here we have the option to add member. We also have the option of removing members by clicking on the X button over here. We can remove Neil or Tyler at any time that we want. Because we received some questions about chat feature in Teams, I’ll go through this feature again today.

Hamed Sultani:

We’ll begin by clicking on the chat button here on the left hand side. From here, you can start one-on-one chat with anybody in your organization, or a group chat. I’ll demonstrate how we can do both of those. First we’ll click on compose to start a one-on-one chat. Just up here, I will get rid of … We’ll click compose again. I will just add Neil here and we can start chatting here. I will chat, “Hey Neil. How is the webinar going today?” Neil can reply back whenever he sees that message. I can see that Neil’s typing, “Looking good, perfect.” The other option that you have is you can manage how you want to send a message.

Hamed Sultani:

You can send that as an important and tag it, and that’s going to change how it will appear, and also urgent which will notify the user for two minutes every 20 minutes until they reply back or they receive that message. Next, we’ll create a group message. We’ll click on compose again at the top here. This time we’ll add Neil and Tyler. Here we go, insert group message. I’ll write, “Hey group, what’s up?” They can reply back just like how Neil replied back, both Tyler and Neil, whenever they get a chance, they can reply back and I can see that Tyler is typing away. There we go. There we go.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s both one-on-one meeting and also group meeting. You can also use the chat feature within Teams. We’ll go onto Teams and we can open up under partners yearly budget, and I can start chatting to both whoever’s a part of that member directly from here as well. I’ll go, “Hey, team.” They can reply back as soon as they get the message. The chat feature is both one-on-one, group or it’s also embedded into Teams itself.

Tyler Sanders:

Hamed, let me just jump in for a second just to give some context around this. It’s beneficial to do a chat within a channel, if you want to have it just focused on members of that channel, and be able to go back and reference that chat context within the channel. It’s much more, it’s easier to search it. It’s easier to separate out stuff rather than just generic chats throughout it. This way, if you’re, we’ll do a demonstration on where we’ve set up a team for matters and we have different channels for different matters. You can then go back to the history on each of those matters, and you can find the chat specific to that rather than searching through potentially tens of thousands of chat messages.

Tyler Sanders:

That’s really why you’d want to use the different chat, either at the high level of the overall Teams platform or within a specific channel.

Hamed Sultani:

Great. That’s a great input Tyler. Thank you. Microsoft has recently added two features that I believe can be very useful for many people watching this webinar. In order to demonstrate this feature, I’ll go back to the Teams tab. We’re already there and expand the partners. We have partners expanded. We can see all the channels and we’ll start a meet now. That’s an instant meeting. I will click on meet now again. From here, if we click on more options, we have the option that comes up for start recording. I will start recording.

Hamed Sultani:

This option will record audio and video calls and allow you to re-watch it after the meeting is done, or at any time you need to reference it. Teams also introduced a note taking application that can be accessed by clicking three dots again. We’ll click more options. Right at the top here, show meetings. I will click take notes and give it a few seconds to start. From here, while you’re having a meeting, you can start taking notes as well. I will write meeting notes. From here we can add anything that we like. We can add pictures. All the options are up here, so we can add quotation marks.

Hamed Sultani:

If you like we add insert a picture, insert a table, and just … It’s a full featured note taking application. I’ll show where that is saved after we end this call. I will close out of this. I will hang up, and here we can see that both the note taking application and also takes a few seconds, but both the recording and the notes are now part of this channel. If you want to look back on your notes that you took, you click on here and all your notes will show up. We’ll go back to post. You also have the option to download the recording.

Hamed Sultani:

This is a great way to record conversation, take notes and reference them whenever you like all in one platform without leaving or requiring multiple applications to do this. It’s all in one. It’s all saved under the post for your team. Having said that, I’ll pass it over to Neil to talk about OneDrive versus SharePoint.

Neil Murray:

Okay, thank you Hamed. Let me just flip this back here. One of the things that we’re going to be demonstrating is some of the file access, how Teams ties into file storage platforms. I mentioned earlier that it ties into both OneDrive and SharePoint. But I wanted to quickly touch on what these are. They’re probably words you’ve heard before, you may not necessarily know what they’re doing. As it relates to Microsoft Teams, both OneDrive and SharePoint are online file sharing sites that Microsoft 365 can tie into from their cloud or it’s hosted in their cloud. But there is a bit of a difference between them.

Neil Murray:

OneDrive, towards that first, OneDrive is a pure file storage platform. It’s designed and its sole purpose is to store files for you. It’s done in a typical file folder structure. If you think of Windows Explorer, for example where you navigate through your shared drives, you have different folders you can expand and sub folders and sub folders. This is how OneDrive is designed and you can do it the same way. The thing about OneDrive though is it’s dedicated to each individual person. If you have a Microsoft 365 package, you have actually a terabyte of OneDrive cloud space available to you, but only to you.

Neil Murray:

This is not cloud-based. What Teams does is, anytime you’re in one of those chats that Hamed just showed, if you’re in a chat function and you want to share a file with someone in chat, it goes and saves that into your OneDrive. Then not just yourself, but because I said it’s only to you, if you’re sharing with someone else, it also copies it to their OneDrive, because they’re never going to get access to your OneDrive. Anyone that’s in your chat will get a copy in their OneDrive. The difference between OneDrive which is a pure file storage and dedicated to one person, you have SharePoint, which is organizational wide. I put in quotes it’s like a sandbox.

Neil Murray:

I always refer to it as sandbox. It’s a lot more than file storage. You can develop websites on it, intranet sites. It can be used for a lot of different communication strategies. What Teams ties into is its file storage capabilities. The key word here too is that it’s organizational wide. As opposed to when you’re posting something in chat, when you saw the actual teams and the channels we put together from multiple people, if you share a file in there, Teams will go and use SharePoint on the back end to share those files. That’s all happening in the background, that it automatically chooses where you’re putting them to.

Neil Murray:

When a file is dumped into SharePoint by Teams, only the people who have access to that team will get access to those SharePoint files. You don’t have to worry about if you’re in the, say a partner team and you share files, only the partners are going to see those budget files or whatnot. Other people in your office are not going to get access to that unless they have access to that team. Again, it’s where that security comes in that restricts who can see what. Hopefully, that little overview of what OneDrive and SharePoint can do will help us with the next demonstration. Tyler, I will hand over to you for an overview of this next demonstration.

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, so it’s going to make more sense, I think when Hamed demonstrates it. All of this is happening relatively transparent to the user. Teams is managing how files get stored, even going back to when Hamed was setting up the teams and the channels and setting permissions, what that’s inadvertently doing is it’s also replicating those permissions on the files within the channels and within the team. What we’ll do now is Hamed will jump in and he’ll go back into Teams. He’ll show you how to see the actual files, and how to identify if they’re OneDrive and SharePoint.

Tyler Sanders:

This will be relevant also, for the other part where we want to show you how to share files with outside recipients, so that you can create links to files for outside people and put the permissions around those for expirations, and for how long they have access and if it’s read only. Then Hamed also in the next part of the demonstration is going to just show how to add different applications to a channel, so that within a channel, you can have all of the relevant documents, whether it’s OneNote, Word, Excel, PowerPoint, images, all easily displayed within a channel.

Tyler Sanders:

Let’s turn it back over to Hamed and get him to go back into the Teams platform and show these functions.

Hamed Sultani:

Great. Thank you, Tyler. I’ll share my screen. There we go. All right. One of the most powerful features of Microsoft Teams is the ability to upload files like Word, Excel, PowerPoint and manage and collaborate with other people in your organization using these documents. I’ll first show how we can upload a file to a channel then collaborate with Neil and Tyler on the same document. Then I’ll show how we can access OneDrive and SharePoint to share this file to an external party. To begin, we’ll click on Teams. We’re already there. Then under partner grouping, we will click on yearly budget.

Hamed Sultani:

From here, we can click on the file tab and I’ll click on upload. We’ll give it a second to load. We’ll click on upload file, and we’ll just upload a yearly budget here. It’s an Excel sheet and now it’s showing that it’s uploaded. A question that came up from our previous Microsoft Teams webinar was, where are the files get stored when I upload to Teams? The answer is it depends where you upload it. If it was shared in a channel like we just did, then it gets stored in SharePoint. Otherwise, if you shared it as a file in a private chat or a group chat, those are stored in your personal OneDrive account.

Hamed Sultani:

Both SharePoint and OneDrive is part of the Microsoft 365 platform, and we can access them from Microsoft Teams directly. For example, the further we just upload it, if we click on open in SharePoint, we can see the yearly budget and it’s under our SharePoint account. You can also access OneDrive by going into … We’ll go back to Microsoft Teams by going into file tab on the left hand side here, and then you’ll see OneDrive. We’ll click into OneDrive. Then now we have a folder called Microsoft Teams chat files. We’ll click on that. Here’s all the files that I’ve shared in the chat.

Hamed Sultani:

From here, we can click on open in OneDrive. Now we’re connected to our OneDrive account, and we can see those same documents here. One of the most important or one the most useful features from here that you’ll use is sharing a link to an external party. We’ll click on more actions here. We’ll click on share. Now, if you want to share it internally, we can choose only people at Vertex for example, or if you want to share it externally to another, somebody outside of your domain, then you will choose anyone with the link.

Hamed Sultani:

Now, if you allow, if you want somebody to be able to download this document, you would have to allow it otherwise, if you don’t want them to download it, you can click on block download, so they can only view it on the web. Also, you can allow this document to be edited by the third party, whoever you’re sending to, also set an expiration date. I will set an expiration date of the 13th which will be 30 days from now. Something that we really recommend is setting a password for this. I will set a password and make sure that it is at least set as good password. We’ll click apply, use password.

Hamed Sultani:

Here we have the option of just sending the link with the Microsoft OneDrive template, by just putting in somebody’s email address here. Or what I like to do is copy the link and then have my own email. Have a template here and then just copy that link in here, and then just send that email off to whoever that you’re trying to send it to. I will close out of this. Now, I’ll demonstrate how multiple people can collaborate on the same document together. I’ll click on the document that we just uploaded into Teams. We’ll go back to Teams. We’ll go under yearly budget. The document that we just …

Hamed Sultani:

We’ll go under files, yearly budget, the one that we just uploaded. If we click on this, and ask Neil and Tyler to join and modify the document with us, they will have access to that, and they can start editing the document. We’ll wait for them to do that. Now, we can start editing this document, just all of us working on this together. The other really great feature that we have available to us here is conversation. While we’re editing this document, we can also communicate back and forth. It’s like a chat within this platform here. We’ll say, “Hello guys,” and that will have all the message all embedded into that chat, and have all of the edits and we can collaborate back and forth on that document. The real power of …

Hamed Sultani:

This is by far my favorite feature in Microsoft Teams, and at Vertex we use this feature heavily. The real power in this is that, all these tasks that used to take separate or several different applications to accomplish, can now be done using the same platform all in one without leaving it. I will close out of this. You can also add a different application to tabs in channels. For example, you can add to this channel, we’ll go to Matter 1505. We can see at the top here that there’s different tabs that have been added. We have one for Excel, PDF, client website. I’ve added Vertex here.

Hamed Sultani:

Whatever relevant information you can actually put this into a channel so that it’s easily accessible. For example, for PDF, I have a document already to go. Everybody that has access to this channel will be able to access all these files without really having to search for it. One of my favorite features is OneNote. The OneNote here, we can see that it’s actually embedded and everybody can start using the OneNote, to take notes to add their information, to remove anything. I’ll show you guys how to … I’ll demonstrate how you can add it. This have been already added, so I’ll remove this and give it a second.

Hamed Sultani:

We’ll click on the plus and here we have all the option to add different features. We had Excel, we had PDF, we had PowerPoint. We had a website, so Word as well, and I’ll add back the OneNote. I’ll click on OneNote here and you can create a new workbook to share, or I have already created one called Lawyers notebook. I’ll click on that and I’ll click save. Here we go. There’s your OneNote. Everybody will have access to this and they can collaborate. Another useful feature that Microsoft has recently added to Teams is the ability to send email directly to Microsoft Teams channel.

Hamed Sultani:

This is useful if you want to archive emails that are related to project tasks or matters you are working on. To set this, you will go to the channel that you want to send it to, click on more information here, more options and then get email address. Here we go. This is the email address, this part here. Microsoft does not allow you to customize the email address currently. However, you can reach out to your IT people and have them modify the global address list, so that they can show up with a more easier to remember name than this. I will show you how that works. We’ll go back to posts and I’ll go to calendar and I will just forward this email to Matters.

Hamed Sultani:

Here I’ve already added a more, an entry into the global addresses, so it’s easier for me to find the channels. We’ll give it a second and it should appear here under posts. Here we go. Here is that email that I just forwarded. Additionally, you can find these emails as an MSG, just as an email that you can backup or open up by going on the files, email messages and all of your emails will also be saved here. If you click on files, the same thing can be found under going into files.

Hamed Sultani:

Having said that, I’ll pass it on to Neil to talk about Zoom versus Teams. And I will close out of here. Neil, take it away.

Neil Murray:

All right. Thank you, Hamed. That was very good. Okay, so one thing I want to touch on now too is, we get a lot of questions often, what is the difference between Zoom and Teams when it comes to video conferencing? There’s a lot of similarities between them and there’s a few differences as well. Right off the bat, cost is a big consideration for some. Zoom does have a free package. There are some limitations with the free package. For example, you can only schedule meetings for 40 minutes. I hear you can actually go beyond that, but that’s the actual scheduled part of it.

Neil Murray:

There are professional and business levels you can get versus Microsoft Teams, if you have that Microsoft 365 package, the majority of them that is included, you already have it there in front of you. There’s participation limits, how many people you can invite into a meeting. Zoom, you can see 100 for the free and professional, 300 for business. Teams, you can have 250 people in a regular Team meeting. If you’re doing a broadcast, such us what we’re doing today, we can actually broadcast up to 20,000 people. It’s quite handy. They’re just not contributing in the conversation.

Neil Murray:

This is a big one I hear a lot. The number of people you can see on a screen at one time. If you have Zoom and you have the right hardware, the proper video card, you can have up to 49 people’s faces on your screen at one time. With Teams right now you’re limited to only four, the four most recent people talked are going to be on the screen. They’re developing in the next few weeks, they’re going to bump that up to nine people. Everyone else are just icons along the bottom. The ability to have these persistent chats and notes and whiteboarding that Hamed has demonstrated, this is something with Teams. As I said it’s persistent, you can go back to them and look at them after the fact.

Neil Murray:

That’s nothing you can do with Zoom. If you didn’t turn on the recording feature at the beginning of the meeting, and that’s only in the paid packages, you’re not getting those back after the meeting is done. The Microsoft integration This is again, something I’ve been mentioning a few times that I absolutely love is the fact that, Teams have integrated fully with everything. I talked about the ability for your calendars to all be in one place. The fact you can pull from OneDrive and SharePoint and Microsoft OneNote, we’ve been using that for years. Now we can use Teams to go back to our notes from years back.

Neil Murray:

That integration is huge. When COVID first kicked in, everyone was starting to talk about Zoom and it blew up. There’s a lot of security concerns that came out. One of the biggest issue with the security is how they develop their URLs or the web address. As an example here, I just did Zoom.com\0123456789. They do their URLs based on 10 numbers, so you can see why people were able to guess at randomly pick numbers and find other people’s meetings that were happening. With Teams, you have almost 200 characters, which looks something like this.

Neil Murray:

I had to make it really small characters to fit. You’re not going to easily guess this. Someone isn’t going to just happen to stumble into your meeting if it’s ongoing, despite the fact that there’s security around it. This alone is a big security part to it. Looking at the time, let’s hand this back then to Tyler to talk about our next demonstration.

Tyler Sanders:

Great, thanks, Neil. The final piece that we’ll dive into here is just how to set up the video conferencing, setting up meetings, how to invite people, how to do it from Outlook also which is a really convenient and more efficient way of setting up a new meeting with Teams. We’ll go back to Hamed’s desktop and he can demonstrate these last few steps.

Hamed Sultani:

Thank you Tyler. I’ll share my desktop. Here we go, and I will open up drive here. All right, in the previous Microsoft Teams webinar, I demonstrated how we can schedule meetings using Teams. In this webinar, I wanted to show how you can use Outlook to schedule meetings. All your calendars are synced from the same source, so it doesn’t matter if you booked a meeting in Teams, Outlook or on your phone. However, the advantage of using Outlook over Teams to schedule meetings is that, you will have access to all your contacts when scheduling, so it’s a lot easier.

Hamed Sultani:

Microsoft has not yet added global address list to Teams, so finding someone externally can be a little bit difficult. I will show that part by just going into Outlook. I’ll open up Outlook, click on calendar. Here we have the option of new Teams meeting. I’ll click on new Teams meeting. Now we have all of the options just like how we did with Teams scheduling. We’ll name this test for webinar, and we’ll make it require that Tyler and Neil come in and we’ll schedule it for … All right, sure 5:00, we’ll do 5:00. 5:00 to 5:30. At the bottom here, you have all of the same exact information that you would when you’re creating a Teams calendar meeting.

Hamed Sultani:

You have the option of guests clicking and joining in. You have some information about who you are, your signature and everything else. From here, I can click on send and it will send it out. I’ll send it back to Tyler to discuss Microsoft subscription.

Tyler Sanders:

Hamed, while I’ve got before you get off that screen, can you just show back, go back into Teams and show the calendar there and how it’s visible along with if you want to schedule the meeting from within Teams.

Hamed Sultani:

Yeah, absolutely. We have the option just like how we had for meet now. You can do an instant meeting. We also have …

Tyler Sanders:

I was going to say the hours, it’s one we use quite frequently if you just want to jump on quickly with somebody, it will just ring on their desktop and then you can have an instant video conference session with them.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right. You also have the option of a scheduled meeting. Here just like how I showed in Outlook, you have the option of creating a meeting. Webinar 1.2, you can add the attendees. We can add Neil and Tyler. At the bottom here, we have the option of changing, scheduling a specific date. The advantage of doing it this way, you also have the option of scheduling it within a specific channel. We can do it, partners, general and send that out as well. We’ll do this one at, maybe at 7:00 PM.

Tyler Sanders:

Hamed, can you try changing the day on that. I just want to show the one other feature there that shows the suggested time, which can be handy also. If you’re trying to schedule-

Hamed Sultani:

Sure.

Tyler Sanders:

… a meeting for multiple people internally, as soon as you select who the people you’re inviting are, once they’re all in there, it looks at everybody’s calendar and finds available slots amongst everybody that’s invited to it, so it can really save a lot of time-

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right.

Tyler Sanders:

… and to coordinate when to schedule things with a group of people internally.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right. The suggest a time just shows up here. We have, it takes a look at everybody’s calendar and it decides on a day, time that it works best for everybody. Here it’s giving us a suggestion from 4:00 PM to 4:30. We could click on that and send that out. Here’s all of our bookings for today that we created. One was, this one here was from Outlook and these two were from Teams.

Neil Murray:

Hamed, based on one of the questions have come in or earlier talking about staggered invitations, so if you’ve invited people to a meeting, they have the ability to add more people down the road. Can you show that?

Hamed Sultani:

Add people? Yes, I believe this option is available. If we click on this, we can add attendee here. If we click on this, we can add whoever we like from our global address list or just directly add them to here.

Neil Murray:

Then what that will do where it says send invite, it’ll only send the invitation to the people you’ve added not necessarily to everyone.

Hamed Sultani:

I believe so. I believe it only updates send updates. I believe it sends it to everybody. I don’t think you can choose it for just specifically the people that you just recently added, because it is a modification and we’ll update everybody. If we send this update … Do you want to send this meeting request without location? Yes, we can send it anyway. Update only attendee. Yes, we do. You’re right, we do get that option. Send only to add it or delete attendees and update to all attendees. Yes, you’re right Neil, we can do that. That’s how you would do it.

Tyler Sanders:

Hamed, can you leave your screen up? What I’m thinking-

Hamed Sultani:

Sure.

Tyler Sanders:

… we’re running out of time here and I wanted to leave some time at the end for questions. Before we just open it up to questions, there was one that came in just about, can you go back and show when we saved the video recording of that meeting, if we want to retrieve that and if you wanted to perhaps distribute that to others or just know how to go back and find that, how you would do it?

Hamed Sultani:

Sure. Wherever the meeting took place, is where it will be saved. For us, we did it under partners. We can see what the channel was … It can be any channel, any public channel. For this, it was general and we can see here that both the meeting notes and the recording is also … are all kept in the same location. You can tell that it was a meeting just from the logo here, meeting started and that came out of the meeting there. It also has attendees of who took place, who participated in that meeting.

Tyler Sanders:

Then what options do you have besides that there? I see the three dots aside from the download is there three dots there?

Hamed Sultani:

Just some more reporting, learn more from what it is.

Tyler Sanders:

Got it.

Hamed Sultani:

But the main feature is just downloading it. You also if I click into the notes, it’ll take you to a meeting now tab, and that gets added whenever you click into that button there. We can see that tab gets added and all of our meeting notes can be found there.

Tyler Sanders:

Great, thanks. We’ve seven, eight minutes left. Now if there’s questions, just please there’s a Q&A button that should be up in the top right and you can submit your question, and we’ll show how to demonstrate that. Hamed, there’s a question coming in. Can you just show once again, how to invite external people to a Team meeting?

Hamed Sultani:

Sure.

Tyler Sanders:

There’s multiple ways to do this. As Hamed was demonstrating the easiest way is Outlook, because Outlook will use your address book and it will also use all of the cached email addresses you’ve been doing in email. If you initiate it from Teams, you actually have to type in that external person’s email address.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right.

Tyler Sanders:

We do all of our invites from Outlook. There’s no real advantage to doing it within Teams if you’re sending out an invite, a Teams meeting invite to external people. Just quickly go back into [inaudible 00:53:05] and demonstrate that.

Hamed Sultani:

Absolutely. We can click on new Teams meeting, and then give it a title so whatever that is. Then just put in whoever that you like to be present.

Tyler Sanders:

I don’t see your Outlook on the screen.

Hamed Sultani:

Let me share that. We’ll go back here. Share and we’ll share my outlook. Can you see that now?

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah.

Hamed Sultani:

Okay, perfect. We’ll click on new Teams meeting. Are you able to see that now the booking?

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah. Wait, no, sorry.

Hamed Sultani:

Oh, okay. Let me go back one step and share my screen, so over here. All right. I’ll minimize this. Can you see that now?

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, it’s got the Teams platform but it looks like your desktop.

Hamed Sultani:

Okay. One more try.

Tyler Sanders:

No, sorry.

Hamed Sultani:

It’s closing out on me. Let’s see. Here we go. Can you see that now my Outlook?

Tyler Sanders:

Yes [crosstalk 00:54:14].

Hamed Sultani:

All right, perfect. New Teams meeting and from here we can give it a title. Then put in whoever that external client, that external email address is. I have a lot of people that I can send it to.

Tyler Sanders:

[crosstalk 00:54:30] the same as creating a regular calendar [crosstalk 00:54:33] the only difference is you’re clicking in Outlook, you’ll have the button rather to select, to create a Team meeting and then it opens up the same window that you would get to create any type of calendar invite.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right. By default, this feature is disabled on Microsoft Teams. You would have to reach out here IT people to enable this feature, so that external people can be added and they can join in to your meetings. That’s the only additional step that you need to take.

Neil Murray:

That question actually just popped up as you were saying that. Exactly if you want to be able to invite external people, that is turned off by default, but talk to your IT provider to help you set that up. Fairly straightforward to turn on.

Hamed Sultani:

Sure. Yep.

Neil Murray:

There’s question what app to external parties edit, file sent to them? I assume that’s asking about if you’ve been sharing through, let’s say, OneDrive and you post that shared link, it depends on what the application. If you’re sharing a Word document, they need Word to edit it. If you’ve shared an Excel document, they need Excel to edit that.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right.

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, so it’s just native to whatever that file format is for them to be able to do it. If it’s a PDF, they just need a PDF viewer to be able to print it. Another question is, adding a bridge number, a dial in number can be done with Teams. It’s just an added subscription fee. Neil mentioned it earlier. It’s $5.

Neil Murray:

$5.10.

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, a month, per organizer so that way you’ll, every Teams invite you’ll get they have the ability to join via computer or via a dial-in number. Useful if you want to just set up a dial-in bridge that you could have multiple people calling into.

Hamed Sultani:

That’s right. That’ll also require your IT people to configure in the background.

Tyler Sanders:

Question about, I guess when the file gets sent externally, if they update it, what happens to that file?

Hamed Sultani:

You have what’s called versioning. You can have different versions of a file. If they’ve edited something and you don’t like, you can always go back to an earlier version. However, during the share process, you can actually lock down if they are able to share it or not. I can go back to share here, and then click on anybody and this option here allow sharing. If you don’t want them to be able to share, then you can just leave that unchecked and they will only have read access to it.

Tyler Sanders:

Great. We’ve got about a minute or two left, if there’s any more questions, just type those in.

Neil Murray:

[inaudible 00:57:47] share as well. It’s just to share where … There were some links here that we did want to share as well, that you can just wrap up if you want to review these.

Tyler Sanders:

Yeah, and we’ll send these out as a follow-up along with the recording to the webinar. There’s a very good Microsoft Teams interactive demo site, and we’ll send out that URL. What that allows you to do is it’s a guided tour that’s interactive. It’s on Microsoft’s website, on their Teams demo site. It will prompt you and say, it’ll initiate a chat with you and show highlight where you go to click the chat and it will say, “Hey, there’s a file ready for you.” It will highlight where to go. You’re clicking, it’s prompting, it’s highlighting those areas. Very useful tool to get acquainted with Teams, and really be guided through and handheld through the basics and some of even the more advanced features there.

Tyler Sanders:

Additionally, we’ll send out the link to all the different Microsoft licensing packages for 365, a link to our previous webinar, a user guide that we created along with recording from today’s webinar. That should give you a lot of a lot of information on what to do next and how to dive deeper into the product. If there’s anything we can help with, please feel free to reach out and happy to get involved and answer those questions and walkthrough different situations that you may want to use with Teams. With that, we’re at the top of the hour and I want to thank everybody for taking the time to attend today.

Tyler Sanders:

We’ll be doing another webinar in June, so look out for that one. Also look out for the recordings from today’s and these other resources. Thanks very much and everyone enjoy the long weekend.